Limited access to the panoramic staircase (bottom of the fall) Details

Panoramic circuit

The best place to begin your visit is at the Station. You can leave your vehicle at the main parking lot at the foot of the waterfall. Next, equipped with a complementary Parc de la Chute-Montmorency guide, you’ll discover the route of the panoramic circuit, stop at various magnificent lookout points to observe the cascading waters of the falls plunging into the St. Lawrence River, and learn more about the historical and geological characteristics of the premises. 

During winter

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The cable car

The waterfall dominates the landscape, but on the other side, the view of the St. Lawrence River, Île d'Orléans, and Québec City will be just as beautiful. Open your eyes wide and enjoy this moment! The climb will only take a few minutes.

One way $1239 /adult

Tickets for sale on site.

Taxes not included.

Manoir Montmorency

Manoir Montmorency was completely destroyed by a fire in 1993. During the rebuild, great care was taken to respect its original English architecture and chic country style. To learn more about its captivating history, step inside, check it out, and then visit the interpretation centre. You can also eat there. 

La Baronne observation deck

Starting from the Manoir’s terrace, there’s a boardwalk along the cliff leading to the suspension bridge. On the way, you can stop at La Baronne observation deck to admire the scenery.  

The suspension bridge

It’s a must-see on your circuit. You’ll feel the waterfall roaring intensely beneath your feet. A knockout experience for young and old alike! 

The Boischatel fault

The waterfall and the Montmorency fault are products of the strain caused by continental shift, a phenomenon dating back thousands of years. You can check out the fault, which is more than 43 kilometres long. It’s very impressive indeed!

The orchard

The orchard is a superb place to have a picnic and to enjoy the great outdoors. Please note that this site shaped part of our history. On July 31, 1759, a major confrontation between the British and French took place right here. Remnants of Wolfe’s redoubt can still be found today.

You can also see Wolfe House, built around 1818. This farmhouse represents a rare surviving example of the domestic architecture of the French regime. The integration of English techniques, such as the use of large panes of glass in the windows, bears witness to its construction some 60 years after the War of the Conquest. Classified as a heritage building, it has undeniable historical value.

The panoramic staircase

Clinging to the flank of the cliff, this impressive staircase features no fewer than 487 steps. A number of athletes train here, but don't let that discourage you. There’ll be ample opportunity for some well-deserved breaks during your climb. At the bottom, there’s a concrete promontory, an ideal place to enjoy being splashed by spray from the waterfall and to feel all its cascading might.

Note: work on the Waterfall Experience project is currently underway. As a result, the panoramic staircase is accessible from above only. Details

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